The Boot House

Well hello there.  I have been away a while.  Life has been busy…what can I say?   I just had to let you all see a home that is near 8th and M.  It is a home that is shaped like a boot.  Really.  A boot.  Specifically a cowboy boot.  It is Texas after all.

I love Huntsville, Texas.  I met my husband there, attended college  at Sam Houston State University, fell in love with the historic charm, and now my sweet granddaughter (and her parents) live there.  What is not to love?  

One of the things I enjoy about the area of town where our rental home and garage apartment are located are the homes built by Phoenix Commotion, a company that is dedicated to using recycled materials and providing affordable housing.  Dan Phillips, the artistic mind behind the homes believes homes should be fun.  

In the neighborhood of our 8th and M home there is a

Budweiser Home 


A home that includes a wall of Budweiser cans flattened, the color scheme of a Budweiser can, and all things beer.

Bottle Home


A home that incorporates bottles as tiny windows, sun catchers, and mosaic walls.

Nursery Rhyme Home


Doesn’t this house make you feel like a home right out of a nursery rhyme?

The Tree House Home


To get to this house you have to cross a steep incline on a wooden bridge.

There are more homes.  The Bone House, Pecan Street Home, Victorian Home, Oak Street Home… the list is long.

The homes are a combination of remodeled existing homes and built from scratch homes.  The Boot House is a built from scratch home on 11th Street, the main street into town off Interstate 10.  

Enjoy the tour:


When my buddy the Social Planner and Iwalked up to the house the first thing we saw was a covered porch with corrugated clear roofing.  The widows were made from reclaimed French doors.  I was so jealous of those doors.  They still have wavy glass.


The porch also had a laundry room.


The laundry room made use of reclaimed wood, old drawers as shelving, and a tin ceiling.

We ended the house into the great room.  It was really too full for me to get a good picture but this on from their Facebook page shows you the space as it leads up to the loft.


The walls in the great room were a mix of reclaimed oak flooring, corrugated tin and the entire floor of the home was reclaimed granite in a crazy quilt of sizes and colors.


The loft space could hold a bed, but a grown up couldn’t stand up in it.

The kitchen space was cool.  It was tucked in around the leg part of the boot with a staircase that goes up as it circles the space.


The space feels much bigger because of the height.

The toe of the boot was a bedroom.

All the doors in this house are made from this really thick reclaimed wood.  I would have stolen them if I thought I could get away with them.  They were beautiful.


This room could probably hold a double bed, but not much more.  It feels so cozy that I could see the space as a media room.

The bathroom had Mr. Phillips’ trademark mosaic broken mirror bathroom mirror in the corner that I could not get a picture of but I did get a shot of the curved wall shower made of granite.


It was bigger than I expected.

Going up the narrow staircase was tricky but only because so many people were wanting to see the view.


The Social Planner stopped so I could get a shot of her going up.

There was a cute deck with patio chairs.


The view was great.


Stainless steel panels were the roof covering.

The master bedroom was covered in old gym flooring and had great built in storage out of the same wood.


The ceiling was covered in lp album covers.


The outdoor of the home


I loved that we got the opportunity to check it out before it becomes a private home.  

Mr. Phillips was there and we got the chance to talk with him about the home.  He said places that people live should be fun.  I agree.


I am not sure I would live in that home at this point in my life, but some college kids are going to LOVE this place.  

I hope you get the chance to check out Dan Phillips’ homes when you are in Huntsville.  Check him out on Ted Talks.

Blessings,

Karen